Photo 23 Aug 5 notes Red Milkweed Beetle in the grass (by Dendroica cerulea)

Red Milkweed Beetle in the grass (by Dendroica cerulea)

#Red Milkweed Beetle #Tetraopes tetrophthalmus #Tetraopes #Tetraopini #Lamiinae #Cerambycidae #Chrysomeloidea #Polyphaga #Coleoptera #Insecta #Hexapoda #Arthropoda #insects #beetle #grass #summer #Duke Farms #Hillsborough #New Jersey #mine

Photo 22 Aug 173 notes nprfreshair:

 Rick Perlstein, author of The invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan spoke to Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies about how Reagan’s stories did not withstand scrutiny: 

"I say that Ronald Reagan could not have survived the age of Google. … He’s telling a story about out-of-control federal bureaucrats and how they even want a tourist paddle wheeler that plies the Mississippi River to get the same kind of fire insurance that commercial ships have, even though this paddle wheeler is this ancient — not a real ship, right? He says, "It has not even had a fire in its entire existence." All I have to do is Google the name of it … and find out that it had a fire two years before he spoke.
He found moral truths in the stories that he told. As people discovered when he was president, they often didn’t withstand scrutiny, but as they also discovered when he was president, it was always hard to make this criticism of Reagan stick. They called him “The Teflon President.” And his ability to make people feel good — to kind of preach this liturgy of absolution in which Americans were noble and pure and could absolve themselves of the responsibility of reckoning with alleged sins in America’s past — that was to me the soul of his appeal.”

Photo:
Ronald Reagan waves to the crowd on the final night of the Republican National Convention on Aug. 19, 1976 in Kansas City, Missouri. By David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images

nprfreshair:

Rick Perlstein, author of The invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan spoke to Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies about how Reagan’s stories did not withstand scrutiny: 

"I say that Ronald Reagan could not have survived the age of Google. … He’s telling a story about out-of-control federal bureaucrats and how they even want a tourist paddle wheeler that plies the Mississippi River to get the same kind of fire insurance that commercial ships have, even though this paddle wheeler is this ancient — not a real ship, right? He says, "It has not even had a fire in its entire existence." All I have to do is Google the name of it … and find out that it had a fire two years before he spoke.

He found moral truths in the stories that he told. As people discovered when he was president, they often didn’t withstand scrutiny, but as they also discovered when he was president, it was always hard to make this criticism of Reagan stick. They called him “The Teflon President.” And his ability to make people feel good — to kind of preach this liturgy of absolution in which Americans were noble and pure and could absolve themselves of the responsibility of reckoning with alleged sins in America’s past — that was to me the soul of his appeal.”

Photo:

Ronald Reagan waves to the crowd on the final night of the Republican National Convention on Aug. 19, 1976 in Kansas City, Missouri. By David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images

#Ronald Reagan #Google #politics

Photo 22 Aug 737 notes reportagebygettyimages:

The August issue of National Geographic magazine looks at the “New Face of Hunger" in the U.S.:

The number of people going hungry has grown dramatically in the U.S., increasing to 48 million by 2012—a fivefold jump since the late 1960s, including an increase of 57 percent since the late 1990s. Privately run programs like food pantries and soup kitchens have mushroomed too. In 1980 there were a few hundred emergency food programs across the country; today there are 50,000. Finding food has become a central worry for millions of Americans. One in six reports running out of food at least once a year. In many European countries, by contrast, the number is closer to one in 20.

For the article, National Geographic assigned Reportage contributor Kitra Cahana to photograph what food insecurity looks like in the suburbs of Houston, Texas. In the image above, Jacqueline Christian, a home health aide and mother of two in the Houston suburb of Spring, says grace before a lunch of supermarket sushi. With a full-time job that requires constant driving, Christian often buys takeout meals. When food runs out, she picks up dinner for her sons from McDonald’s dollar menu and tells the boys she’s already eaten, “just hoping they leave a piece of the burger.”
Read an interview with Kitra and see more of her photos on National Geographic’s Proof blog.
(Photos by Kitra Cahana/National Geographic)

reportagebygettyimages:

The August issue of National Geographic magazine looks at the “New Face of Hunger" in the U.S.:

The number of people going hungry has grown dramatically in the U.S., increasing to 48 million by 2012—a fivefold jump since the late 1960s, including an increase of 57 percent since the late 1990s. Privately run programs like food pantries and soup kitchens have mushroomed too. In 1980 there were a few hundred emergency food programs across the country; today there are 50,000. Finding food has become a central worry for millions of Americans. One in six reports running out of food at least once a year. In many European countries, by contrast, the number is closer to one in 20.

For the article, National Geographic assigned Reportage contributor Kitra Cahana to photograph what food insecurity looks like in the suburbs of Houston, Texas. In the image above, Jacqueline Christian, a home health aide and mother of two in the Houston suburb of Spring, says grace before a lunch of supermarket sushi. With a full-time job that requires constant driving, Christian often buys takeout meals. When food runs out, she picks up dinner for her sons from McDonald’s dollar menu and tells the boys she’s already eaten, “just hoping they leave a piece of the burger.”

Read an interview with Kitra and see more of her photos on National Geographic’s Proof blog.

(Photos by Kitra Cahana/National Geographic)

#hunger #nutrition #health #poverty #inequality #politics

Photo 22 Aug 9 notes Dolomite Mountains, Levico Terme, Italy (Giuseppe Cacace/AFP/Getty Images) (via Supermoon photographs from around the world | Photos | The Big Picture | Boston.com)

Dolomite Mountains, Levico Terme, Italy (Giuseppe Cacace/AFP/Getty Images) (via Supermoon photographs from around the world | Photos | The Big Picture | Boston.com)

#full moon #moon #moonrise #mountains #Dolomites #Levico Terme #Italy

Quote 22 Aug 134 notes

We view with pride and satisfaction this bright picture of our country’s growth and prosperity, while only a closer scrutiny develops a somber shading. Upon more careful inspection we find the wealth and luxury of our cities mingled with poverty and wretchedness and unremunerative toil. A crowded and constantly increasing urban population suggests the impoverishment of rural sections and discontent with agricultural pursuits. The farmer’s son, not satisfied with his father’s simple and laborious life, joins the eager chase for easily acquired wealth.

We discover that the fortunes realized by our manufacturers are no longer solely the reward of sturdy industry and enlightened foresight, but that they result from the discriminating favor of the Government and are largely built upon undue exactions from the masses of our people. The gulf between employers and the employed is constantly widening, and classes are rapidly forming, one comprising the very rich and powerful, while in another are found the toiling poor.

As we view the achievements of aggregated capital, we discover the existence of trusts, combinations, and monopolies, while the citizen is struggling far in the rear or is trampled to death beneath an iron heel. Corporations, which should be the carefully restrained creatures of the law and the servants of the people, are fast becoming the people’s masters.

— 

Grover Cleveland - State of the Union Address, 1888

THIS WAS MORE THAN 100 YEARS AGO, Y’ALL

(via lillabet)

#Grover Cleveland #Gilded Age #19th Century #1880s #history #politics

Video 22 Aug 9,418 notes
via .

#mountains #lake #Moraine Lake #Banff National Park #Alberta #Canada

Video 22 Aug 278 notes

cool-critters:

Keel-billed toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus)

The Keel-billed Toucan, also known as Sulfur-breasted Toucan or Rainbow-billed Toucan, is a colorful Latin American member of the toucan family. The Keel-billed Toucan can be found from Southern Mexico to Venezuela and Colombia. It roosts in holes in trees, often with several other toucans. This can be very cramped, so the birds tuck their tails and beaks under their bodies to conserve space while sleeping. Like many toucans, Keel-billed Toucans are very social birds, rarely seen alone. The diet of Keel-billed Toucans consists mostly of a wide range of fruit, but may also include insects, eggs, nestlings and lizards, as well as small birds.

photo credits: .supernova., Lauri Vain

#Keel-billed Toucan #Ramphastos sulfuratus #Ramphastos #Ramphastidae #Piciformes #Aves #birds #toucan

Photo 22 Aug 151 notes latimes:

Since Obamacare, emergency room visits are down at L.A. County public hospitals, a Times analysis finds.

latimes:

Since Obamacare, emergency room visits are down at L.A. County public hospitals, a Times analysis finds.

#hospital #emergency room #health care #PPACA #Obamacare #Medicaid #politics

Photo 22 Aug 90 notes rhamphotheca:

Audubon California
The Black-throated Sparrow (Amphispiza bilineata) is a summertime visitor to the lower Central Valley. It used to be called the Desert Sparrow due to its affinity for desert habitat with cactus, mesquite, creosote bush, and sagebrush. A juvenile was seen yesterday in Sacramento county’s Bufferlands, an open space buffer surrounding the Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant. Photo by Kenneth Cole Schneider

rhamphotheca:

The Black-throated Sparrow (Amphispiza bilineata) is a summertime visitor to the lower Central Valley. It used to be called the Desert Sparrow due to its affinity for desert habitat with cactus, mesquite, creosote bush, and sagebrush. A juvenile was seen yesterday in Sacramento county’s Bufferlands, an open space buffer surrounding the Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Photo by Kenneth Cole Schneider

via fauna.

#Black-throated Sparrow #Amphispiza bilineata #Amphispiza #Emberizidae #Passeroidea #Passerida #Passeri #Passeriformes #Psittacopasserae #Eufalconimorphae #Aves #birds #sparrow #California

Video 22 Aug 310 notes

seascienceweekly:

Lets start off with the not-so-much meat eating sharks. Well, kinda, the Whale Shark (middle) still eats krill, and we don’t really know much about the Megamouth Shark (bottom), but it probably eats Jellyfish and other sorts of plankton. Either way, with the Basking Shark (top), these three sharks make up the filter feeding, planktivorous sharks. They swim with their massive mouths open through the water and filter out all the tiny particles for food. Even though they have similar methods of feeding they’re actually quite different! Whale sharks fall under the taxanomic classification of Orectolobiformes (or carpet sharks), similar to Nurse Sharks, while Megamouths and Basking Sharks fall under Lamniformes (Mackerel Sharks) like great whites.

Both Whale Sharks and Basking Sharks are classified as vulnerable by the IUCN, where as the Megamouth Shark is so rare  that we can’t really say - only 3 Megamouths have ever been recorded on film!

Whale Sharks are absolutely incredible animals, they can grow to 10 meters, weigh 10 tonnes and live to 70 years, while Basking Sharks are slightly smaller at 8 meters and 5 tonnes.

They might all look a bit scary, but are completely and absolutely harmless to humans, the only thing they’d hurt is krill!

via .

#Whale Shark #Megamouth Shark #Basking Shark #Orectolobiformes #Lamniformes #Elasmobranchii #Chondrichthyes #shark #marine life #ocean

Video 22 Aug 17 notes

usda-nrcs:

Conservation and the Great Lakes

Containing about 21 percent of the world’s surface fresh water, the Great Lakes are an incredibly important national and international asset. In addition to fresh water, they provide many economic and recreational opportunities, as well as habitat for diverse species.

That is why NRCS has made major conservation investments in the Great Lakes region, including:

  • Since 2009, providing more than $45 million in conservation assistance to agricultural producers on more than 1.8 million acres in the Western Lake Erie Basin Watershed. 
  • Focusing that conservation investment on reducing sediment and nutrient runoff.
  • Reducing runoff into the Lake Erie Watershed by an estimated 6 million pounds of nitrogen, 1 million pounds of phosphorous and 400,000 tons of sediment each year.

NRCS will continue to make conservation investments in the Great Lakes region through its Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

By applying conservation practices - such as cover crops and riparian buffers - we will prevent nutrients and sediment from contaminating our Great Lakes.

Click here to read a personal account of the positive impact conservation has already had on Lake Erie. 

#conservation #Great Lakes

Quote 22 Aug 5 notes

His theology is in many ways at odds with contemporary culture, including an unapologetic belief in complementarianism — the idea that men and women have different roles to play — which in practice has meant that women do not serve as pastors or elders at Mars Hill, and he urges husbands to lead their wives and wives to submit to their husbands. He has objected to chauvinism, as well as feminism, but his critics say that, at his worst, he has had a tendency to objectify women and denigrate gays.

Over the years, Mr. Driscoll has weathered steady criticism from the left: His theological views, and disparaging comments, about femininity and homosexuality have provoked anger from more liberal Christians. But the criticism he is now facing, much of it first chronicled by a blogging psychology professor, Warren Throckmorton, is more damaging because it is coming from other conservative Christians — many of them his onetime friends, allies and supporters — concerned by his management of his church and his behavior toward subordinates.

“It’s almost unfathomable that it’s transitioned into what it is — it’s as if Che Guevara ended up as a New York stockbroker,” Ron Wheeler, a Seattle firefighter who for seven years was a protégé and friend of Mr. Driscoll, said in an interview. Mr. Wheeler, like many others who broke with Mr. Driscoll years ago, stayed silent for a long time, but several weeks ago he posted an open letter to Mr. Driscoll online, saying that the pastor had threatened and slandered him, and writing, “I thought you were my brother and you treated me like scum.”

— 

Mark Driscoll Is Being Urged to Leave Mars Hill Church - NYTimes.com

It’s so shocking when you used to be the one who was doing the demeaning and shunning to have those tables turned.

(via jenn2d2)

#religion #Mars Hill Church #Seattle #Washington

Photo 22 Aug 1,217 notes asapscience:

Lethal doses of common chemicals via Compound Interest. 
Wanna learn more about water intoxication and whether or not it could happen to you? Watch our video on the topic. 

asapscience:

Lethal doses of common chemicals via Compound Interest

Wanna learn more about water intoxication and whether or not it could happen to you? Watch our video on the topic. 

#LD50 #water #caffeine #alcohol

Video 22 Aug 95 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Harbour Crab (Liocarcinus depurator)

Also known as the Sandy Swimming Crab, the harbour crab is a species of swimming crab (Portunidae) which occurs in the North Sea, Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, and Black Sea. Like other members of the family Portunidae the fifth pair of legs on L. depurator are modified into “paddles” which allow the crab to swim throughout the water column. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Decapoda-Brachyura-Portunidae-Liocarcinus-L. depurator

Image(s): Hans Hillewaert

#Harbour Crab #Liocarcinus depurator #Liocarcinus #Portunidae #Brachyura #Decapoda #Malacostraca #Crustacea #crab

Video 22 Aug 172 notes

whatthefauna:

Spotted garden eels live in colonies of up to several thousand individuals. They spend the majority of their lives with only the top half of their body sticking out of a burrow they make in the sand, eating plankton and other tiny animals that float by. If in danger, the entire “garden” retracts into the sand in the blink of an eye.

Images: blueparadiseindonesia, Eric Cheng, Ryan Murphy

#Spotted Garden Eel #Lazy Gob #Heteroconger hassi #Heteroconger #Congridae #Anguilliformes #Actinopterygii #fish #eel #marine life


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