Photo 2 Sep 5 notes fogandrhodies (by P.E.MartinPhoto)

fogandrhodies (by P.E.MartinPhoto)

#forest #Rhododendron #fog #trees #Olympic National Forest #Washington

Video 2 Sep 338 notes

rhamphotheca:

Asian Multi-spotted Ladybird Beetle (Harmonia axyridis):

The first photo set shows the variety in coloration and spotting, bit what stays the same are the large white edge spots on the sides of the pronotum (thoracic shield).  (photo by ©entomart)

The second set shows the full life cycle of H. axyridis. (photo by puddingforbrains).

This species has been widely introduced, purposefully, into Europe and North America, as garden pest control. This has had a deleterious effect on several of our native lady bird beetle (“ladybugs”) species, as native species are often unable to compete with the voracious predator of scales and aphids.

In the United States, we do have several species of native Ladybird Beetle. Find out more here:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/179

#Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle #Harmonia axyridis #Harmonia #Coccinellinae #Coccinellidae #Cucujoidea #Polyphaga #Coleoptera #Insecta #Hexapoda #Arthropoda #beetle #insects #lady beetle

Photo 2 Sep 1,648 notes llbwwb:

(via 500px / Who goes there ? by Ian Billenness)

#Brown Bear #Ursus arctos #Ursus #Ursidae #Arctoidea #Caniformia #Carnivora #Mammalia #bear #reflection #forest #boreal forest #Finland

Photo 2 Sep 15 notes A Sea Otter poses at Moss Landing, California. Picture: Veronica Craft/HotSpot Media (via Pictures of the day: 19 August 2014 - Telegraph)

A Sea Otter poses at Moss Landing, California. Picture: Veronica Craft/HotSpot Media (via Pictures of the day: 19 August 2014 - Telegraph)

#Sea Otter #Enhydra lutris #Enhydra #Lutrinae #Mustelidae #Musteloidea #Caniformia #Carnivora #Mammalia #otter #California

Text 2 Sep 988 notes Sept. 2 8:15 am

justice4mikebrown:

via ok.

#police violence #Darren Wilson #Michael Brown #Ferguson #Missouri #politics

Photo 2 Sep 247 notes nprfreshair:

Dana Goldstein, author of The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, spoke to Fresh Air about how teachers have become both “resented and idealized” over 200 years of history.  
In the interview Goldstein explains how teaching became a woman’s profession:

"A lot of people are surprised to learn that back in 1800, 90 percent of American teachers were actually male. Today we know that actually 76 percent of [them are] female, so how did this huge flip happen?
The answer is that as school reformers began to realize in the 1820s that schooling should be compulsory — that parents should be forced to send their kids to school, and public education should be universal — they had to come up with a way to do this basically in an affordable manner, because raising taxes was just about as unpopular back then as it is now. So what we see is this alliance between politicians and education reformers in the early 19th century to redefine teaching as a female profession.
They do this in a couple ways: First, they argue that women are more moral in a Christian sense than men. They depict men as alcoholic, intemperate, lash-wielding, horrible teachers who are abusive to children. They make this argument that women can do a better job because they’re more naturally suited to spend time with kids, on a biological level. Then they are also quite explicit about the fact that [they] can pay women about 50 percent as much — and this is going to be a great thing for the taxpayer.”

nprfreshair:

Dana Goldstein, author of The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, spoke to Fresh Air about how teachers have become both “resented and idealized” over 200 years of history.  

In the interview Goldstein explains how teaching became a woman’s profession:

"A lot of people are surprised to learn that back in 1800, 90 percent of American teachers were actually male. Today we know that actually 76 percent of [them are] female, so how did this huge flip happen?

The answer is that as school reformers began to realize in the 1820s that schooling should be compulsory — that parents should be forced to send their kids to school, and public education should be universal — they had to come up with a way to do this basically in an affordable manner, because raising taxes was just about as unpopular back then as it is now. So what we see is this alliance between politicians and education reformers in the early 19th century to redefine teaching as a female profession.

They do this in a couple ways: First, they argue that women are more moral in a Christian sense than men. They depict men as alcoholic, intemperate, lash-wielding, horrible teachers who are abusive to children. They make this argument that women can do a better job because they’re more naturally suited to spend time with kids, on a biological level. Then they are also quite explicit about the fact that [they] can pay women about 50 percent as much — and this is going to be a great thing for the taxpayer.”

via flummery.

#education #sexism #labor #labor history

Video 2 Sep 59 notes

newbirder:

My favorite bird in  Maine, the Common Loon. Their calls are beautiful, varied, and iconic for lakes in Maine. 

#Common Loon #Gavia immer #Gavia #Gaviidae #Gaviiformes #Aves #birds #loon #seabirds #Maine

Photo 2 Sep 1,666 notes beatonna:

Comic!
She lives in a tower, she’s got a curse.  A vague curse.  But still.
(Little note at the bottom about merchandise too! Hoorayy new things)

beatonna:

Comic!

She lives in a tower, she’s got a curse.  A vague curse.  But still.

(Little note at the bottom about merchandise too! Hoorayy new things)

#cartoon #The Lady of Shalott #Hark! A Vagrant!

Photo 2 Sep 80 notes montereybayaquarium:

From Collapse to Recovery: A Seafood Success Story!
Just 14 years after the groundfish fishery on the U.S. west coast was declared a commercial failure and an economic disaster, our Seafood Watch program just upgraded 21 species that are recovering in the wild and are now sustainable choices for seafood lovers.
It’s a dramatic turnaround — the most dramatic in the 15-year history of Seafood Watch — and reflects significant improvements in federal fishery management to restore these economically important fisheries in California, Oregon and Washington. It also underscores the important roles that fishermen and our colleagues in the sustainable seafood movement play in bringing the oceans back to health.
The new Seafood Watch rankings mean that species like rockfishes (often sold commercially as “snapper”), as well as spiny dogfish, lingcod and a number of flatfishes, including Dover sole, sand dabs and starry flounder are back on the menu.
"This is one of the great success stories about ecological and economic recovery of a commercially important fishery,” says Margaret Spring, vice president of conservation and science, and chief conservation officer for the Aquarium.
“Not long ago many of these species were in collapse,” says Tim Fitzgerald, who manages the sustainable seafood program for the Environmental Defense Fund – one of the organizations that worked with fishermen and fisheries managers on the turnaround. “Thanks to smarter fishing regulations and fishermen’s commitment to conservation, consumers and seafood businesses can now add West Coast groundfish to their list of sustainable choices.”
Learn more about the recovery of this important fishery.

montereybayaquarium:

From Collapse to Recovery: A Seafood Success Story!

Just 14 years after the groundfish fishery on the U.S. west coast was declared a commercial failure and an economic disaster, our Seafood Watch program just upgraded 21 species that are recovering in the wild and are now sustainable choices for seafood lovers.

It’s a dramatic turnaround  the most dramatic in the 15-year history of Seafood Watch — and reflects significant improvements in federal fishery management to restore these economically important fisheries in California, Oregon and Washington. It also underscores the important roles that fishermen and our colleagues in the sustainable seafood movement play in bringing the oceans back to health.

The new Seafood Watch rankings mean that species like rockfishes (often sold commercially as “snapper”), as well as spiny dogfish, lingcod and a number of flatfishes, including Dover sole, sand dabs and starry flounder are back on the menu.

"This is one of the great success stories about ecological and economic recovery of a commercially important fishery,” says Margaret Spring, vice president of conservation and science, and chief conservation officer for the Aquarium.

“Not long ago many of these species were in collapse,” says Tim Fitzgerald, who manages the sustainable seafood program for the Environmental Defense Fund – one of the organizations that worked with fishermen and fisheries managers on the turnaround. “Thanks to smarter fishing regulations and fishermen’s commitment to conservation, consumers and seafood businesses can now add West Coast groundfish to their list of sustainable choices.”

Learn more about the recovery of this important fishery.

#seafood #fishing #fish #marine life #ecology #Pacific Ocean

Quote 2 Sep 7 notes

Lawyers for the two men from the Center for Death Penalty Litigation, a nonprofit legal group in North Carolina, began pressing for DNA testing of the physical evidence in the case, which included a cigarette butt found near sticks used in the murder.

In 2010, testing by an independent state agency, the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission, found a match for the DNA on the cigarette butt – not to either of the imprisoned men, but to Roscoe Artis, who lived only a block from where Sabrina Buie’s body was found.

Only weeks after the murder of Ms. Buie, in fact, Mr. Artis confessed to the rape and murder of an 18-year-old girl in Red Springs, a town of fewer than 4,000 residents. Mr. Artis received a death sentence, later reduced to life, for that crime and remains in prison today. Officials have not explained why, despite the similarities in the crimes, they kept their focus on Mr. McCollum and Mr. Brown even as the men proclaimed their innocence.

#DNA #prison #judiciary #North Carolina #death penalty #capital punishment #politics

Photo 2 Sep 139 notes Orange Mountain Dandelion (Agoseris aurantiaca)

Orange Mountain Dandelion (Agoseris aurantiaca)

via textless.

#Orange Mountain Dandelion #Agoseris aurantiaca #Agoseris #Cichorieae #Cichorioideae #Asteraceae #Asterales #flowers #wildflower

Photo 2 Sep 14 notes Grosbeak and Goldfinch (by Dendroica cerulea)

Grosbeak and Goldfinch (by Dendroica cerulea)

#Blue Grosbeak #Passerina caerulea #Passerina #American Goldfinch #Spinus tristis #Spinus #Fringillidae #Cardinalidae #Passeroidea #Passerida #Passeri #Passeriformes #Psittacopasserae #Eufalconimorphae #Aves #songbird #birds #grosbeak #summer #Finderne Wetlands #Bridgewater Township #Somerset County #New Jersey #mine

Video 2 Sep 403 notes

todaysdocument:

The Fall of Atlanta:

The city of Atlanta, Georgia fell to Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman on September 2, 1864, following a six week siege after the Battle of Atlanta on July 22, 1864.

Photos from the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865

The impact of the fall of Atlanta was instrumental in the eventual victory for the Federal forces. It boosted morale in the North and insured the reelection of President Abraham Lincoln which meant that the war would continue to the South’s capitulation. Until then, with no major Confederate Army left to contest Sherman and his men, he would order them to move east, towards Savannah, and from there, north into the Carolinas. Unopposed, Sherman’s Army brought the war to the heart of the South and to its civilian population.

These photos are from a series by George Barnard. Once an employee of Matthew Brady Studios, Barnard worked for the Topographical Branch of the Army Engineers after December 1863. Assigned to Sherman’s Army, he captured many of the images of the Atlanta Campaign on early photographic equipment.

via The Atlanta Campaign of 1864: The Camera at War

(Be sure to follow atlantahistorycenter's series of Civil War Letters for more!)

#Civil War #Atlanta Campaign #Atlanta #Georgia #1860s #19th Century #history

Photo 2 Sep 23 notes atlantahistorycenter:

"Atlanta has fallen. Our troops took it last night. The 1st Brigade of our division is now in the city… Three Cheers for Sherman and his gallant army."-James Neuman, September 2, 1864

atlantahistorycenter:

"Atlanta has fallen. Our troops took it last night. The 1st Brigade of our division is now in the city… Three Cheers for Sherman and his gallant army."
-James Neuman, September 2, 1864

#Civil War #Atlanta #Georgia #Atlanta Campaign #Battle of Jonesborough #1860s #19th Century #history

Photo 2 Sep 12 notes Nabataean Theatre, Petra, Jordan (by Ameeta Deshpande)

Nabataean Theatre, Petra, Jordan (by Ameeta Deshpande)

#Nabataean Theater #theater #architecture #Petra #Jordan


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