Photo 21 Feb 17 notes 
There may be less birds for birders to see in the world as the planet warms. Climate change, in combination with deforestation, could send between 100 and 2,500 tropical birds to extinction before the end of century, according to new research published in Biological Conservation. The wide range depends on the extent of climate and how much habitat is lost, but researchers say the most likely range of extinctions is between 600 and 900 species, meaning about 10-14 percent of tropical birds, excluding migratory species….
Those birds most susceptible to climate change impacts include high-elevation species which could quite literally run out of habitat, and those already restricted to small ranges. An increase in extreme weather events, such as droughts and storms, may also imperil some species. The increasing intensity of hurricanes, even if frequency diminishes, may threaten coastal birds, while long droughts could hurt birds’ ability to find food during breeding season. Already, the Amazon has suffered two record droughts in the last 7 years, leading many scientists to fear for the ecosystem’s resiliency in the face of climate change.

(via Birders beware: climate change could push 600 tropical birds into extinction)

There may be less birds for birders to see in the world as the planet warms. Climate change, in combination with deforestation, could send between 100 and 2,500 tropical birds to extinction before the end of century, according to new research published in Biological Conservation. The wide range depends on the extent of climate and how much habitat is lost, but researchers say the most likely range of extinctions is between 600 and 900 species, meaning about 10-14 percent of tropical birds, excluding migratory species….

Those birds most susceptible to climate change impacts include high-elevation species which could quite literally run out of habitat, and those already restricted to small ranges. An increase in extreme weather events, such as droughts and storms, may also imperil some species. The increasing intensity of hurricanes, even if frequency diminishes, may threaten coastal birds, while long droughts could hurt birds’ ability to find food during breeding season. Already, the Amazon has suffered two record droughts in the last 7 years, leading many scientists to fear for the ecosystem’s resiliency in the face of climate change.

(via Birders beware: climate change could push 600 tropical birds into extinction)

#Resplendent Quetzal #birds #climate change #global warming #science

  1. cumaeansibyl reblogged this from ragingbitchfest and added:
    Is that a resplendent quetzal? I love those guys. Did a couple reports on them in school. One of the few birds I can...
  2. thiscruelcruelworld reblogged this from dendroica
  3. ascendescend reblogged this from dendroica
  4. ragingbitchfest reblogged this from dendroica and added:
    Pardon me, I’m going to go cry now.
  5. dendroica posted this

Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.