Photo 5 Apr 58 notes ecocides:

Climate Change Sends Beetles Into Overdrive
Call it the beetle baby boom. Climate change could be throwing common tree killers called mountain pine beetles into a reproductive frenzy. A new study suggests that some beetles living in Colorado, which normally reproduce just once annually, now churn out an extra generation of new bugs each year. And that could further devastate the region’s forests.
Pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae), which scuttle from New Mexico north into Canada, are trouble for trees, says study co-author Jeffry Mitton, an evolutionary geneticist at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Beginning in late summer along high altitude sites in the eastern Colorado Rocky Mountains, for instance, swarms of hundreds or even thousands of these small black bugs will single out individual lodgepole pines (Pinus contorta) or related trees, then advance on them en masse. Females dig deep burrows inside the pines’ trunks and drop down their eggs. They also deposit a special type of fungus that the insects carry with them that grow inside the trees, eventually helping to kill them. Beetle larvae feed on that same fungus throughout the winter, escaping their burrows the following August.
Recently, pine beetles have inexplicably exploded across their range. In British [Columbia] alone, the insects gutted and killed about 13 million hectares of trees in about a decade. Mitton says it’s possible to fly in a small plane over pine forests here for an hour or more and see almost no living pine trees.
[read the full article on science.com]

ecocides:

Climate Change Sends Beetles Into Overdrive

Call it the beetle baby boom. Climate change could be throwing common tree killers called mountain pine beetles into a reproductive frenzy. A new study suggests that some beetles living in Colorado, which normally reproduce just once annually, now churn out an extra generation of new bugs each year. And that could further devastate the region’s forests.

Pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae), which scuttle from New Mexico north into Canada, are trouble for trees, says study co-author Jeffry Mitton, an evolutionary geneticist at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Beginning in late summer along high altitude sites in the eastern Colorado Rocky Mountains, for instance, swarms of hundreds or even thousands of these small black bugs will single out individual lodgepole pines (Pinus contorta) or related trees, then advance on them en masse. Females dig deep burrows inside the pines’ trunks and drop down their eggs. They also deposit a special type of fungus that the insects carry with them that grow inside the trees, eventually helping to kill them. Beetle larvae feed on that same fungus throughout the winter, escaping their burrows the following August.

Recently, pine beetles have inexplicably exploded across their range. In British [Columbia] alone, the insects gutted and killed about 13 million hectares of trees in about a decade. Mitton says it’s possible to fly in a small plane over pine forests here for an hour or more and see almost no living pine trees.

[read the full article on science.com]

via RORSCHACHX.

#environment #Colorado #Pine beetles #climate change #ecology #nature #science #news

  1. finitecircuit reblogged this from reagan-was-a-horrible-president
  2. descartesmeaway reblogged this from reagan-was-a-horrible-president
  3. popetilidie reblogged this from reagan-was-a-horrible-president
  4. reagan-was-a-horrible-president reblogged this from sarahlee310
  5. sarahlee310 reblogged this from kp777
  6. kp777 reblogged this from alice44
  7. oliveramy reblogged this from rorschachx and added:
    NOOOOOOO! NOT MY COLORADO ROCKY FORESTS! NOOOOOO! :,(
  8. momentaryloss reblogged this from sleepingvegetables
  9. talikira reblogged this from dendroica and added:
    This is actually really sad, because whenever we make a trip to Banff or into the mountains, you can see those dead...
  10. sleepingvegetables reblogged this from rorschachx
  11. moonhowler56 reblogged this from rorschachx
  12. barelyalice reblogged this from rorschachx
  13. alice44 reblogged this from dendroica
  14. pallas-athena reblogged this from ragingbitchfest
  15. other-stuff reblogged this from dendroica
  16. ragingbitchfest reblogged this from dendroica and added:
    They’re so numerous that they’re attacking other species of trees: ones they usually don’t touch. And they’re at much...
  17. dendroica reblogged this from rorschachx
  18. ecofriendly87 reblogged this from rorschachx
  19. maternalism reblogged this from rorschachx
  20. soggyangryseaweed reblogged this from rorschachx
  21. i-cant-find-my-bluebird said: I assume you mean British Columbia in the last paragraph?
  22. mybluesubmarine reblogged this from rorschachx
  23. up4somet reblogged this from rorschachx
  24. rorschachx posted this

Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.